SLOW – Red Light Ahead!

Or maybe yellow light.

I’ve noticed NBC has really clawed its way back to the top of prime time network comedy after its post-Seinfeld, post-Friends collapse.  30 Rock and the Office have stood out, but they’re not quite enough.  NBC reached out this year with a new show called Perfect Couples‘ and since it’s Hollywood we shouldn’t be surprised that a rival network has a show that touches on the same theme: Traffic Light.

Both shows are about the wacky trials and travails of the 30-something crowd.  Whether you’re 30, 60, or 15 you can understand the painfulness of becoming an adult: leaving behind the near-limitless potential that defines childhood.  Or at least, that’s what the shows are hoping for.  It’s interesting that this “growing up is comically hard” theme used to be the domain of Friends, Scrubs, and even the Office.  You know, shows about 20-somethings?  Here of course goes the obligatory line about how this generation seems to hit milestones later and later.

Still, PC and TL have their moments, mainly pushed by the more outlandish of the characters.  Unfortunately, this means that TL is doomed for mid-season replacement as its lone wildcard is the commitment-phobe Ethan, played cheekily by Brit Kris Marshall.  While funny and providing room for a conveyor belt of eye-candy guest stars, there’s only so much of the goofy bachelor routine we’ll handle.  And tonight showed that the other two couples are lacking both the comic plots and acting chops to really carry the show.  PC on the other hand has two “crazy” couples (the ultra-devoted, and the ultra-impulsive) that are written and acted well, and even lets the straight-man couple Dave & Julia have their moments of insanity.

But these early-30s relationship shows are like bite-sized candy bars: the initial kick feels good but there’s no lasting satisfaction.  After you enter a social scene that doesn’t involve a keg and flirting banter about midterms, we all can relate to the sacrifice of some individuality for security, the unrealized dreams we had for careers, and the distance of friends who’ve succumbed to careers or family.  These are all comic things that we can laugh about it, but in the end a 30-minute sitcom needs to make us escape our lives a little.  It can’t be like a stand-up routine, just exaggerated observational humor.  Shows like Arrested Development, Community, Seinfeld, and Futurama were amazing because they took characters that were simply unreal and let them play in situations that the audience knew didn’t exist!  What’s more, these shows appealed to anyone not just those reflected by the white, middle-class cast and situation.

I think it’s at this point that I point out it’s a crime that both shows basically stole their theme from the League.  FX’s solid late-night comedy about a group of guys who socialize over fantasy football does a much less lame version of showing men reverting to inner boy and carving out some irresponsibility from their lives.  And not a single character can claim to be the straight man in this comedic group.  Also, unlike its network counters, the League manages to show the women as full characters, not just nags or emotional wrecks; surprising for a network that exclusively targets men.

 

Media type: Television
From: Traffic Light
Title:  Credit Balance
Watch it at: http://www.hulu.com/watch/218199/traffic-light-credit-balance#s-p1-so-i0